Home >> Mead Making / Industry News >> Owner of Harris Meadery in Florida is on a Mission for Mead
Every batch starts with locally brewed honey. It takes 1,200 pounds of it to complete one batch. John Harris began the legwork of his Harris Meadery three years ago with the idea of being Orange Park’s first mead maker. Harris’ Meadery is complete with multiple filtration tanks, which filter both input and output product to .22 microns. Essentially sterile. It is then pumped to his large fermenter or his sealed 50 gallon canisters. After two weeks to two months, he removes the product and can carbonate it, or add in extra flavors. He hand bottles it or stores it in a keg and ships it off to shelves.
Every batch starts with locally brewed honey. It takes 1,200 pounds of it to complete one batch. John Harris began the legwork of his Harris Meadery three years ago with the idea of being Orange Park’s first mead maker. Harris’ Meadery is complete with multiple filtration tanks, which filter both input and output product to .22 microns. Essentially sterile. It is then pumped to his large fermenter or his sealed 50 gallon canisters. After two weeks to two months, he removes the product and can carbonate it, or add in extra flavors. He hand bottles it or stores it in a keg and ships it off to shelves.

Owner of Harris Meadery in Florida is on a Mission for Mead

Brewer on a mission for mead

by Jesse Hollett
Clay Today

ORANGE PARK, FL – There’s something ancient brewing in Orange Park.

John Harris’ home off Milwaukee Avenue sits in a housing development studded with finely manicured lawns, birdbaths and a white picket fence. At first, the structure blends into residential camouflage.

Go out back, however, and the suburban façade drains away to sparkling machinery as Harris’ $60,000 mead brewery touches the pitched roof of his garage’s ceiling.

Established in June 2016, Harris Meadery is the culmination of long talks with the town to convert his house’s zoning to facilitate an operational brewery for mead, essentially the alcoholic intermediary between craft beer and wine made from fermented honey.

“It’s the world’s oldest fermentable beverage,” Harris said. “It’s over 8,000 years old – any culture that has contact with honey and beekeeping has naturally discovered mead all on their own.”

He jokingly theorizes that civilization first discovered mead when they discovered drunk bears. Still, mead is an alcoholic beverage and the town’s agreement with Harris came with a caveat – do not sell alcohol on site.

Despite the challenges, with bare bones equipment, Harris Meadery currently distributes its flagship meads to roughly 60 different vendors between Clay, Duval County and Georgia.

Full Story: Brewer on a mission for mead

Meadery Profile: Harris Meadery

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Rob
A novice mead maker, but a huge mead enthusiast! I'm also the owner and Site Administrator of TheMeadery.net and reside in Manchester, New Hampshire.